Providing Litigation Services Throughout Nevada
Free Initial Consultations
Holding child's hand

Child Support Changes in 2020

As we have noted in prior blogs, child support changes have been pending for quite some time and we were uncertain when the changes would occur. Well, the changes have happened and they are in effect commencing on February 1, 2020. This is brief overview regarding the child support changes. We hope that it helps anyone going through litigation and provides a framework for calculating child support before your case is heard by the Court.

When dealing with child support, the Eighth Judicial District Court Rule (Clark County-Las Vegas and surrounding areas) require that litigants file a Financial Disclosure Form pursuant to local rule 5.506. The Financial Disclosure Form is required because it provides the Court with a snapshot of a the filing Party’s income and expense. Each litigant is required to file a Financial Disclosure Form and attach to the filing their three most recent paycheck stubs from all sources.

The biggest change in the child support guidelines is the calculation is no longer based upon a flat percentage of a parent’s gross monthly income. The percentage changes based upon the level of a parent’s income. We have tried to break it down for ease as follows:

  • One child:
    • The first $6,000.00 of a parent’s gross monthly income is calculated at 16%,
    • The next $4,000.00 of a parent’s gross monthly income is calculated at 8%, and
    • Anything over $10,000.00 in gross monthly income is calculated at 4%.
  • Two children:
    • The first $6,000.00 of a parent’s gross monthly income is calculated at 22%,
    • The next $4,000.00 of a parent’s gross monthly income is calculated at 11%, and
    • Anything over $10,000.00 in gross monthly income is calculated at 6%.
  • Three children:
    • The first $6,000.00 of a parent’s gross monthly income is calculated at 26%,
    • The next $4,000.00 of a parent’s gross monthly income is calculated at 13%, and
    • Anything over $10,000.00 in gross monthly income is calculated at 6%.
  • Four children:
    • The first $6,000.00 of a parent’s gross monthly income is calculated at 28%,
    • The next $4,000.00 of a parent’s gross monthly income is calculated at 14%, and
    • Anything over $10,000.00 in gross monthly income is calculated at 7%.
  • Any number above four children:
    • The first $6,000.00 of a parent’s gross monthly income is calculated at 28% plus 2% for each additional child,
    • The next $4,000.00 of a parent’s gross monthly income is calculated at 14% plus 1% for each additional child, and
    • Anything over $10,000.00 in gross monthly income is calculated at 7% plus ½ a percent for each additional child.

Here are few quick examples to assist in figuring out child support based upon earnings using gross monthly figures and the number of children:

  • $3,500.00:
    • 1 child- $560.00
    • 2 children- $770.00
    • 3 children- $910.00
    • 4 children- $980.00
    • 6 children- $1,120.00
  • $4,000.00:
    • 1 child- $640.00
    • 2 children- $880.00
    • 3 children- $1,040.00
    • 4 children- $1,120.00
    • 6 children- $1,280.00
  • $6,000.00:
    • 1 child- $960.00
    • 2 children- $1,320.00
    • 3 children- $1,560.00
    • 4 children- $1,680.00
    • 6 children- $1,920.00
  • $7,500.00:
    • 1 child- $1,080.00
    • 2 children- $1,485.00
    • 3 children- $1,755.00
    • 4 children- $1,890.00
    • 6 children- $2,160.00
  • $12,000.00:
    • 1 child- $1,360.00
    • 2 children- $1,880.00
    • 3 children- $2,200.00
    • 4 children- $2,380.00
    • 6 children- $2,720.00

The calculation of child support depends on the physical custody arrangement. If a parent has primary physical custody then that parent’s income is not used to calculate child support. If parents have joint physical custody, the Court must calculate each parent’s respective child support obligation and off-set the child support of the parents.

The new guidelines for child support cannot be easily located on the internet. It will take a bit for them to easily accessible. As such, it might become necessary to reach out to an attorney to discuss your legal options if you have questions regarding child support related issues.